Thursday, September 20, 2007

SoulVille Step-through frame designs;

Ok folks, I will have a formal poll posted on the blog soon, but here you go;

SoulVille step-through Option A- borrowed from the Dutch bikes. Simple and elegant with a single swooped top tube, joined to the down tube with "struts".

SoulVille step-through Option B- this is actually a modified mixte frame, complete with small diamter double top tubes that bypass the seat tube and are welded to the drop out. Very much like the old Euro bikes of years past.

Go ahead and vote for your favorite. As far as I am concerned, I like them both and do not feel like there is a bad version either way. Being that I like Democracy, I am leaving it to a vote, so start voting and tell all your friends to vote as well.

NOTE; This poll is just for the frame design itself- nothing else. This isn't for color, or graphics, or part spec... just frame design. You can comment here, but please place your vote in the poll that will be on the left side of the page.

As always, thank you for your valuable feedback!

Tim

26 comments:

Anonymous said...

Option B: will be huuuuge in Japan.

Chris H

Graham said...

I'm going with B. It has cleaner lines and makes the bike look longer. Nice looking bike. Keep up the great work.

spokejunky said...

Agree with graham that Option B has cleaner lines. The supports on A's downtube make it look like girders on an old iron bridge.

James said...

I like the way the mixte frame looks too and the mixte frame design is probably the stronger/stiffer of the two options. The one small thing I don't like about the mixte frame compared to the Dutch design is the increased frame width caused by the two outer tubes positioned right at the rider's ankles. That will probably not be a problem, but it is something I would watch for since the two smaller tubes curve down instead of forming a strait line from the headtube to the rear dropouts.

Anonymous said...

Option B:
Stronger rear triangle;
Better triangulation around the mid-section (triangles are goooood);
Curves reflect the curved seat stays and tbose of the diamond-frame "Men's" version;
More importantly: It looks way cooler.

DM

StevenCX said...

Agreed, B. To pull off the Dutch look it would have to look more Dutch in other ways too, like 'top' tube curving up into the seat tube more, black of course, and more old school in general.

Tom Jones said...

the mixte is hot -- nice mix of old school with new flair. go with it.

Anonymous said...

Option A - mixte frames are u.g.l.y imho...

Tarun said...

Option B is far superior. As long as you can keep the "delicate" look of it, I think it is the winner. In black with some brown leather trim, it would even make a nice gentlemen's city commuter bike (for those who aren't so insecure in their manhood that they would not ride a mixte).

stickboy said...

I like opt 1. Lemme add the idea that you use the male version curved top tube but flip it upside down for the ladies spec model. Beeyonkee has dropped that model from their line up. That style top tube did awesome in the shop priced around 429 w/sram twisters. Pleeeze!

pete said...

They both look awesome but I voted Mod-Mixte. :D

Fritz said...

I like the "modified Dutch inspired" option A better -- it doesn't have to be completely old school to look retro yet modern.

I think the skinny side by side "top" tubes don't look all that great; it just looks "cheap" in my mind.

You should ask BSNYC what he thinks ;-)

Bernie said...

I definitely choose option A. I do think maybe the concave curve of the top tube could be a little more pronounced, but that style appeals to me more than the mixte.

Anonymous said...

Got to be #b for me. The lines look much more elegant, which seems to fit the bike better. The dutch style works good in basic black, but B has more soul. I particularly like how the downward curve of the top tubes emphasizes the upward curve of the seat stays. Very cool. On A, the big space between the chain & seat stays looks empty compared to the clutter of the front end with 2 big tubes and the struts. On B, the design is much more balanced.

Dave R said...

I like the first version. Mixte frames with the tiny tubes going all the way back to the dropouts always looked fragile (and kind of cheap) to me. I have always associated that frame style with department store bikes that are heavy, cheap, and likely to break. The Euro design looks cleaner, and doesn't seem so fragile.

Nick said...

Girlfriend and I both like the pseudo-mixte option. Mixtes are in up here - I've seen more of them in the three weeks I've been in SF than I have in my whole life!

PdxRunner said...

I also like option "b". Would it be possible to turn the seat stays "upside down" so that the curve of the seat stays matches the down tube curve?

Anonymous said...

option B please.
Tom Harber

Anonymous said...

B for me.

Super Rookie said...

b.

Phil said...

No question B

Tarun said...

Okay, I already voted B, but I might have gone with A if it had the fuller wheel cover of the Dutch style bikes, a rear rack, and slightly more swept back handlebars.

Also, matching luggage would be the hotness.

Matt Boulanger said...

My vote is for B. I like the idea of more delicate tubes, it reflects a movement away from the massive hydroformed aluminum cruiser frames (hey, a big bike just like I had as a kid!) and toward more "adult" designs for real people who use their bikes for real stuff, like getting around town.

Anonymous said...

I vote option A, strongly - and I am planning on buying one of these bikes as soon as they are available (apparently Norco will carry them in Canada but I have seen no news of that form them yet).
I like the similarity to the Dutch model and it looks more solid to me.

Very cool bike..
maria

Anonymous said...

My question is is there a step through, A, B, or C, which is on the market?

Tim Jackson- Masi Guy said...

Anon- yes, option B won and is being produced. We should see the first ones here in late May or early June.